Victorian Occultism and the Art of Synesthesia | The Public Domain Review

Somehow it makes sense that Donovan, the musical muse whose song “Mellow Yellow” and the scents his music seems to evoke me in me?  Like lavender and the use of his music for Yardley soap go together. The ideas of the spiritual realm of ectoplasm and Madame Blavatsky’s wish to embrace to a degree Indian mysticism.  It starts to all make sense that the Beatles were the first to explore publicly the delicious juxtaposition of sitars, chanting and their auric fields in music.

But, I had no idea that synesthesia went back this far.  The illness of synesthesia seems to be a wonderful one, albeit no doubt quite overwhelming!  The ability to smell thoughts or see the colors of scents.  An illness os excessive sensory perception.  I often wondered if I have this disease!  But, no one has said just yet that Mar’s seems to be made of  of chile and mole chocolate lava as a planet!

What then does jupiter taste like if the moon is made of blue gorgonzola cheese?  I guess it tastes sweet. Just my guess. Like violet British “Chowards” candy. Be careful if you bite into the planet Saturn, for it might bite you back indeed!   

Thought-Forms, a strange, beguiling, frequently pretentious, utterly original book first published in 1901, emerged from this ferment of late-Victorian mysticism. It was written by Annie Besant and Charles Leadbeater, erstwhile members of the London Theosophical Society alongside Yeats, and it features a stunning sequence of images that illustrate the book’s central argument: emotions, sounds, ideas and events manifest as visual auras.

The book’s grand ambitions are evident from the first page. “To paint in earth’s dull colours the forms clothed in the living light of other worlds,” Besant laments, “is a hard and thankless task.” She insists that the images in the book “are not imaginary forms, prepared as some dreamer thinks that they ought to appear.” Rather, “they are representations of forms actually observed as thrown off by ordinary men and women.” And she hopes that they will make the reader “realise the nature and power of his thoughts, acting as a stimulus to the noble, a curb on the base.” This grandiloquence was typical: fin de siècle occult leaders produced some of the most baroque writing in literary history, the purplest of purple prose.

Yet what are we saying, exactly, when we call black words on a white page “purple”?

These sorts of underlying associations between words, colors and sounds were precisely what motivated Thought-Forms. In other words, the book was about synesthesia. The illustration of the music of Mendelssohn reproduced above, for instance, depicts yellow, red, blue and green lines rising out of a church. This, Leadbeater and Besant explain, “signifies the movement of one of the parts of the melody, the four moving approximately together denoting the treble, alto, tenor and bass respectively.” Moreover, “the scalloped edging surrounding the whole is the result of various flourishes and arpeggios, and the floating crescents in the centre represent isolated or staccato chords.” Color and sound had become commingled.

“The music of Gounod” – Source.

Yet Leadbeater and Besant intended not only to visualize sound, but to demonstrate their distinctive psychic gifts: the ability to detect spiritual “vibrations” of ideas, emotions and sounds as visual forms. This, in other words, was a sort of spiritual synesthesia, as much a religious act as a neurological one.

via Victorian Occultism and the Art of Synesthesia | The Public Domain Review.

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