Icelandic magical traditions.

I am certainly interested in some primordial Bjork magic! What’s up with primal-fear burning icelandic magicians? It is a fascinating post Otove! thanks* I did not know how to read comments till now, sorry! Thanks!  Oh yes, upon listening to the youtube just now which is below:  the black part of magic I do not like nor live.  I feel that it is taking on too much of a burden to curse others.  However it is all very unique.  The magic of  Fakirs is very practical.  How to get into another’s mind and make it so that what they literally see is an illusion, I gather it is very useful is you are 4ft tall!  Just think? Woody Allen sees his Mother everwhere and in everyone?  Where is the fakir to accomplish this feat?  Oh we are all full of magic even if only foolishness .  Love to all!

The Borscht of times, the Würste of times

Between 1625 and 1683 twenty one Icelanders were burnt alive for practicing magic. The Icelandic witch-craze was imported from Europe by members of a ruling class of semi-nobles who were to a large extent educated in Denmark and northern Germany. One extended family of landowners, primarily in the northwest of the country, supplied the majority of the sheriffs presiding over the court cases for witchcraft and a large portion of the clergy, among them priests who wrote treatises against magic, heavily influenced by European works such as the Malleus mallificorum.

The European influence is not as obvious when the charges in witchcraft cases are reviewed. Contemporary sources, mainly annals and court records, tell us that a third of the charges were for causing sickness in persons and livestock, and another third for possessing grimoires or pages with galdrastafir, i.e. magical signs or staves. Heresy and satanism are hardly mentioned at…

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2 thoughts on “Icelandic magical traditions.

  1. […] The Magic and Sorcery of Iceland (ladyphilosopher.wordpress.com) […]

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